Tennesseetransitions


Gardening As If My Life Depended On It

I can’t believe February’s almost over and I haven’t written a post all month. I’ve been quite busy working on some small home projects, tackling a small mountain of sewing repairs, finishing up January’s library loans, and taking part in some time consuming committee work at my church. They’re all fine, indoor activities for what I’m hoping will be our  final Winter month, but I’ll be sooo happy when I can get outdoors again and begin planting and gardening.

My New Year’s resolution to slow down to the ‘speed of light life’ is starting to have an effect. I’m finding more time to be spontaneous, and more time to do those things that are most gratifying to me. I gain a lot of pleasure in being a domestic Goddess and don’t consider it ‘gender inequality’, but that’s just me. And even though retirement has certainly given me extra time in my daily life, that extra time had become so filled with activities, that I was feeling a bit overwhelmed by them all. Retirement also comes with a fixed income and I wanted to focus my life energy on trying to maximize that income, all the while increasing my happiness and well being quotas. Slowing down and eliminating some of the to-do’s allows that to happen. After a hiatus from gardening last summer due to our mid-season move to town , I truly missed the growing,  preserving and of course, the fresh food that we’ve come to depend on from our garden. We’ve witnessed rising food prices this winter; $4 a pound for butternut squash, for example, along with questionable food products (horsemeat burgers anyone?), Listeria and Salmonella scares at our beloved Trader Joe’s stores, and according to the January 15th ‘U.S. Drought Monitor’, moderate to exceptional drought still covers 58.9% of the contiguous U.S. (And by the way, what the hell has happened to gas prices this week?)

drought-0014-media

gas prices

So,what’s a body to do? My plan is to grow more food and then find ways to do it more sustainably. This is the year I hope to become more adept at having no- or-low-till beds, seed saving, cover cropping and succession planting, mulching and capturing rainwater to irrigate with during the dry spells, making compost with nothing more than leaves and urban-sourced manures, and tending vermiculture bins- all of which will reduce my dependence on ‘store bought’ inputs. Market prices for food and gasoline, the lingering drought, the state of Georgia making thirsty gulping noises again along with North Korea behaving very badly all serve to make life feel so out of control that I find growing food is the best medicine for my personal angst. It’s a 2-part strategy since it’s not just the food, but the actual being in the garden that offers me peace in troubled times. I’m gardening this year as if my life depended on it.

P.S. I thought some of you might be interested in attending this lecture:

The next event in the Leading Voices in Public Health Lecture Series will be held tomorrow,Thursday, February 21, 2013.
Dr. Robert S. Lawrence will be speaking on:
 
“Rethinking Water:  The High Meat American Diet is Draining Our Aquifers.”
 
Dr. Robert Lawrence is the Founding Director of the Center for a Livable Future and Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.  A brief summary of his impressive career is included in the flyer.
 
The Lecture will be at 7:00pm EST in the 2nd floor ballroom of the Millennium Centre in Johnson City, TN.  It is free and open to the public.  CME credits will be provided for on-ground participants only. For those of you who will be outside of the Tri-Cities areas, or otherwise unable to attend, the Lecture will be livestreamed from http://elearning.etsu.edu/publichealthlive.htm
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3 Comments so far
Leave a comment

Hi Sam,
I made a new strawberry bed last year the no till way. I doubt I’ll ever go back. Don’t miss double digging one bit:)
The weeds still find a way, alas……
Getting spring fever! Can’t wait. My mother in law refers to it as “the call of the wild”! ha!

Comment by Sara Huber

Sara, you can be sure I’ll be calling you to get particulars 😀 Thanks!

Comment by simpleintn

Growing food is medicine……..I love your idea! Well put.

Comment by sarasinart




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