Tennesseetransitions


This ‘n That

This ‘n That  will be a regular feature of this blog-just updates on previously mentioned topics or stuff I think you might like to know about:

  • Well, you may not give a damn, but I just wanted to show off  our very first ripe Stupice tomato of the 2012 growing season: Michael and I shared it on our lunch sandwiches today. And so the cycle continues…

Small is Beautiful

  • C.O.O.P. continues it’s efforts to convince our city council to allow its’ citizens to have a small flock of backyard hens. Last night’s council meeting simply exasperated us. They voted to ‘defer’ voting on the proposed zoning hearing until they understand it better. Here it is councilmen: Keep it simple. Allow JC residents to have 6 freakin’ hens. No roosters. No running at large. We don’t need to change every zoning code in the city. Just change the wording of the CITY CODE. If you’re one of the many that would like to have a small flock of your own, if you see this as a right as valid as having dogs, please support our efforts by planning now to attend the next meeting. I’ll try to let you know with a minimum of 48 hours advance notice, but they’re always on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month. I KNOW you’re busy, so am I. But having chickens in my backyard, providing my gardens with compost and my table with eggs, is a big step in being more food self sufficient and in helping my family be more resilient in the face of looming adversity. I KNOW too, that when I write things like that last sentence it sounds like Chicken Little’s cry of “the sky is falling! the sky is falling!” Well, the term “the sky’s the limit” is sooo 1950’s. Maybe the sky IS falling! (More on “Peak Everything” soon in this blogspace)

  • More Johnson City news: At the same council meeting last night, they approved money to be spent to study the feasibility of constructing a permanent farmer’s market site: http://www.johnsoncitypress.com/News/article.php?id=100366  (But can’t we have chickens and fresh eggs to go along with all those locally grown fruits and veggies?)
  • My beehives are thriving. Even the one that swarmed last month! The queenless hive immediately raised another queen, and they are busy, well, as bees! filling their honey supers. I’ve found the hard way, that the less I mess with them the better off they are. They surely know more than I do about what’s best for them. Now, if we can just get Bayer to withdraw their agricultural chemical, imidacloprid. Read the latest study here about the newly discovered cause of Colony Collapse Disorder: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120405224653.htm   I’m moved enough to find an alternative to Bayer when I get a headache, and I’m going to write the company a letter. Not a love letter either…
  • The Carver Peace Garden has all the available plots spoken for PLUS an extra one that was tilled up to accommodate a nearby family that heard about us at the last minute! I’ve been recently contacted by two different local TV stations that want to do stories on Community Gardens in the TriCities area. I’ll let you know when it will air. Also, word has it that the Tree Streets Community Garden still has a few plots left and you don’t have to be a resident of that area to be part of the fun! Contact Lyn Govette if you’re interested at: lgovette@charter.net The good news about this year’s gardeners is that we are such a diverse bunch. Not so much plain white bread 🙂
  • I’m still trying to practice ‘bread labor’ (see post from April 14th). I get a lot accomplished when I don’t let distractions divert my attention-a lifelong problem for me. There have actually been a couple of days recently that I didn’t feel that I had to devote even that four hours to bread labor because I was caught up enough with that damn to do list to go to the zoo and music festivals, read more and even take a coupla naps. That’s about to change soon though, I’m afraid. More on that later too!
  • After reading my post about ‘Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes’, I have several people helping me fold origami paper cranes to be sent to the Japanese memorial in August. Care to fold a few with us? I’ll teach you-in about 5 minutes.  Let’s have a party! I need 1,000!

This I believe: Small changes in daily life add up to something important and there are thousands of small things we can all do. Are you doing something, no matter how small you think it is, to help society transition to a lower-energy, more localized world? One that runs on trust, cooperation and human power rather than oil? If so, I’d love to hear about it. Post your comments below.




This ‘n That

This ‘n That  will be a regular feature of this blog-just updates on previously mentioned topics or stuff I think you might want to know about:

  • C.O.O.P. continues it’s efforts to convince our city council to allow its’ citizens to have a small flock of backyard hens. The local newspapers reported our appearance at the April council meeting as ending in a 3-2 ‘victory’ for us. We wish. It was actually just a vote to keep the current wording of the city code, then changing the zoning regulations to match that code. Once the zoning rules are changed, THEN 3 of 5 council will have to vote YES at  3 separate public readings! We have a way to go, but with the positive publicity we’ve  already seen an uptick in requests for us to offer more Urban Henkeeping classes. Stay tuned…

  • One of my beehives swarmed on Saturday, but those that remain seem to be raising a new queen already. I love that they take that ‘leap of faith’ and strike out with their old queen to find a new home-not knowing where their new home will be, nor where their next meal will come from. Seems careless, but is very very fundamental to their survival in nature.
  • The Carver Peace Garden still has 2 extra plots available: 15′ x 20′- $15.00 for the year. Water and tools furnished. If interested, let me know or pass this along to someone that might be.
  • Earth Day festivities at Carver Park include workshops on composting, monarch butterflies, vermiculture and a program about ‘Marakwet’-a clean water project in Africa. It begins at 10 AM, with lunch offered by the Rotary Club at noon, followed by the annual interfaith ‘Blessing of the Garden’ being performed by my own minister, Rev. Jacqueline Luck at 1 PM. After our plots have been properly blessed, those that want to, will begin planting. Come early, stay as long as you like!
  • Yesterday was the first day of practicing ‘bread labor’ (see post from April 14th). I got a lot accomplished and wasn’t tempted at all by diversions (because all of my work was outside). Michael and I prepared our beds and paths in our Community Garden plot, then I came home and planted out all the flower transplants that were getting too scraggly in their tiny pots. Zinnias and cosmos and nasturtiums, oh my!
  • After reading my post about ‘Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes’, I have several people helping me fold origami paper cranes to be sent to the Japanese memorial in August. Care to fold a few with us? Let’s have a party! I need 1,000!
  • New research suggests that the more stuff we buy, the unhappier we become. And the more unhappy we are, the more we go shopping. Bummer. I’m happy to report that I’m happy 🙂



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