Tennesseetransitions


Frugal Friday- May 29, 2015

I consider having the time to hang my laundry on the line or bake my own bread as a luxury, not a drudgery.

I was hanging my laundry this morning and two of the three female attorneys that have their office next door came out on to their back porch as I was doing so, laughing and chatting. After a minute or so, I noticed it had gotten mighty quiet over there, so I glanced over towards them and almost with embarrassment they said they were “wistfully” watching me hang the sheets. These are both women much younger than me, but they said they “don’t have time to hang laundry” and wish they could because they love the smell of air dried clothes so much. They remembered their grandmothers doing it. (I guess that makes me old enough to be their grandmother). Anyway, I offered to let them hang up my wet laundry anytime they wanted, but I had no takers. However, when I offered them some just-dug oregano one of them jumped on the offer as though I’d offered her home made chocolate chip cookies! I was pleased to share a bit of my philosophy of simple living with these two hard working career women and hope we can have more conversations this summer over that clothesline.

It’s been a meaningful and productive week for me. And even though productive is really just a euphemism for ‘working my ass off’, it’s been pleasant. We enjoyed out of town company over the holiday weekend, but when they left Monday morning, they not only left us with some fond memories, they also left some fresh avocados, cherry tomatoes and a container of leftovers from a schwanky Asheville restaurant in the frig.  So naturally, it was my civic duty to not let it go to waste.

Monday: We enjoyed those leftovers for lunch, and then for supper used one of the avocados and tomatoes to make guacamole, which we enjoyed with fresh corn tortillas and a Mexican Quinoa/Spinach salad, made with stuff I already had on hand and in the garden. We also took our car for a free deluxe car wash and vacuum job-they give them to all veterans on Memorial Day and Veteran’s Day! Su-weet deal, saving us $10 IF we’d had to pay for it. But of course, we normally wash and vacuum our own car so we didn’t really ‘save’ $10 but it really was a nice little gift to get it done for free on that hot day.

Tuesday: With the warming weather I could tell my spring-planted lettuce was going to bolt, so I harvested bags and bags of it, donated most of it to One Acre Cafe, and and then enjoyed a huge veggie salad Monday night, adding leftover red onion, beans, hard boiled eggs, sunflower seeds, carrots, green pepper strips and the rest of the avocado to it, again, using stuff I already had on hand or in the garden.

Wednesday: We enjoyed the monthly Wednesday Night Supper of veggie quiche, fresh salad, with strawberries and ice cream for dessert at our church for just five dollars each. This monthly dinner always has great food, is well worth the price and we really enjoy the chance to share some extra time with our church family, and of course, take a break from cooking!

Thursday: Earlier in the week a friend that Michael had played with at the Farmer’s Market on Saturday morning dropped by with a bag of 2 huge tomatoes, 2 lbs of new potatoes, a large sweet onion, 4 crisp apples and more as his share for playing that day. Our small market only pays a tiny cash stipend for playing, but all the vendors are then asked to contribute something for the musicians. We didn’t expect all that, but once again, enjoyed the windfall! I made curried potato salad which we enjoyed with veggie burgers topped with fresh lettuce and thick slices of sweet onion and tomato. Another day I used the other tomato to make fresh pico de gallo to scoop on top of cumin black beans and rice. Ad nauseum, all made with ingredients I already had on hand.

Friday:  If you think all I’ve done this week is cook and eat, I’d say, “not quite”. I go through spurts when the garden is pumping out fresh food almost by the hour and I really do enjoy trying new recipes and making old favorites that take advantage of that bounty. So yeah, there’s been a lot of that this week. Once you get over food needing to be fast, easy and cheap, it makes a big difference in what you can produce.  But one night we played a gig that was quite fun (and earned decent money as well as a great free meal), we’ve gotten both our gardens almost fully planted, we’ve taken some great walks and enjoyed the new public art that was installed at the nearby park, had time to savor a good book, watched a Netflix movie or two, and met a friend for coffee. Can you say “contented”?

I hope these occasional Frugal Friday posts inspire you to make space in your life so that you too can have time and money to enjoy the things in life that make you happy. As we transition to a lower energy lifestyle ( and YES I definitely believe we’ve passed “Peak Oil”) , we’ll all need to adapt to a smaller energy footprint. Whether that’s growing some of your own food, solar drying your laundry, riding your bike to the library, cooking from scratch or learning to use tools ‘like a man’, those activities will become necessary skills, rather than ‘romantic notions’. I hope these posts give you even a small inkling of how sweet that “lower energy” life can be!



What’s growin’ on?

 Between four fun road trips with my best friend this summer…

20140831_120953[1]and several fun gigs with our band…

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…as well as not-so-fun computer problems, home decorating projects and now end-of-summer gardening chores, I’ve accepted the fact that I just don’t have as much time to write in the summer as I do during the cooler months. I love the change of seasons, but I am especially looking forward to the slow-down of autumn this year. Our garden has been wildly productive, and that’s the good news. Really. But I’m one of those people that can’t bear to let food go to waste, especially when I’ve worked hard to grow it, and this wildly productive garden has put pressure on me to DO SOMETHING with it all. I’ve given it to friends and strangers…

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI’ve canned it, frozen it, dried it, eaten it and delivered it…

20140728_115524[1]I’ve stored it under the beds and dressers, in the pantry and now the butternuts will join the potatoes, garlic, onions, beets and carrots in the root cellar…

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…and still, it continues. At this writing, I’ve cleared out practically everything I had growing in my plot at the community garden, have amended the tired soil there with many wheelbarrows of our home-made compost and the last of the shredded leaves that the city delivered to us last fall, and ‘put it to bed’ for the upcoming winter with a warm blanket of scarlet clover. But! I couldn’t resist buying some cool season transplants of cabbages, broccoli and Brussels sprouts and set them out this week in a little empty row I found. Since I didn’t have the time it would’ve taken to start them from seeds, it seemed a good choice this year. They won’t produce for a couple of months, but even now, we still have an abundance of fresh food!  There’s still LOTS of Swiss chard, with spinach and kale comin’ on strong…

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The storage onions and sweet bell peppers are finished, but the late onions and hot peppers will keep coming ’til frost. I’m canning lots of hot pepper jelly for hostess and gift giving. This stuff ROCKS with cream cheese and crackers!

pepper jelly

The cherry tomatoes still fill our salad bowls each evening at supper, along with the take-a-chance-romaine that I thought wouldn’t produce in such hot weather-surprise! There are still fresh mints, herbs, parsley and basil, and with cooler weather my self-seeding cilantro patches have reappeared-just in time to add to the final bowls of fresh salsa or pico de gallo that we love with to eat with black beans and rice…

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August-planted beets and carrots have joined the parsnips and will be mulched with more leaves once they’re all full sized, then finally! garlic will join them in their warm bed come early November. THEN maybe I can get back to writing more regularly here. I have a whole page of ideas that I think are worth sharing with you; ideas about redefining prosperity, batch cooking, Little Free Libraries, worm bins, wildcrafting, herbal helpers, Transition Towns, and much more-all small stories about big change. BUT!  if we collectively plan and act early enough, we can create a way of living that’s significantly more connected, more vibrant and more fulfilling than the one we find ourselves in today. It is time to take stock and to re-create our future in ways that are not based on cheap, plentiful and polluting oil (and gas) but on localized food, sustainable energy sources, resilient local economies and an enlivened sense of community well-being. Stay with me as we grow together!

happy fall ya'll

 




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